History


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The tradition of Salesianum dates from January of 1903. Encouraged by the Sisters of the Visitation, the Oblates of Saint Francis de Sales established their first school in America under the patronage of the Rt. Reverend John J. Monaghan, D.D., Bishop of the Diocese of Wilmington.

The first faculty members of the "Collegiate School" were Fathers Charles Fromentin, Louis Jacquier, and James Isenring, O.S.F.S. Twelve boys formed the student body of the school which was affectionately called the "French College." In 1907, four students were members of the first graduating class of Salesianum. 

The growth of Salesianum School has nurtured the birth of the Oblate Congregation in America and the growth of an educational system in which the Oblates are engaged. By 1957, 2,312 young men have graduated from Salesianum. In April of that year, a new era was inaugurated with the opening of Salesianum at its present location. The new school is a monument to Father Thomas Lawless, O.S.F.S., the eighth principal of Salesianum, whose ideas and ideals of education have made a great impact upon the Catholic educational system in the United States. The school observed its 100th Anniversary in 2003. 

A network of Salesian gentlemen can be found throughout the United States, as well as Europe, Asia, and Africa.

Salesianum boasts of over 17,000 alumni who are leaders in every area of industry. A network of Salesian gentlemen can be found throughout the United States, as well as Europe, Asia, and Africa. Salesianum’s core mission remains to educate young men in the example of the Gentleman Saint, Francis de Sales. Over four generations, Salesianum has progressed from a neighborhood school to the finest college preparatory school in the region. It continues this effort one gentleman at a time.